Wisconsin Tax Filing

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Filing Your Taxes in Wisconsin

Filing taxes is always a little frustrating no matter which way you look at it and sometimes you need a little help. You will find information here to help guide you through the process and make doing your taxes easier.

Income tax returns must be filed by April 18th.

Working families with children may qualify for a credit from the State of Wisconsin. To find out if you qualify, file Form 1A or 1. The amount of the credit will be determined based on the number of children and the family’s income.

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Wisconsin Tax Forms

How Do I Know What Kind of Resident I Am? What Form Do I File?

There are four groups of people who need to file some sort of tax form in Wisconsin. Wisconsin residents, part-year Wisconsin residents, people who live in Wisconsin but work in another state, people who live in another state and work in Wisconsin and people who had other forms of income from Wisconsin that tax year.

Wisconsin Residents

Anyone who lived in Wisconsin for the entire year is a full-year Wisconsin resident. Full-year residents are required to file a Wisconsin resident income tax return using Form 1, unless their income is below the amounts in the table found in the Form 1 Instructions which you can download above.

Part-Year Residents

If you only resided in Wisconsin for part of the year or moved to or from Wisconsin, you are considered a part-year Wisconsin resident. Part-year residents whose income exceeded $2,000 are required to file a part-year resident return with Wisconsin. You will be taxed on all income earned while you were a Wisconsin resident as well as on any income you earned in Wisconsin while you were a resident of another state.

To file the portion of your return as a resident, you would file according to the instructions for full-year Wisconsin residents. For the portion of the year during which you were not a Wisconsin resident, file according to the instructions for filing a nonresident return (see “Work in Wisconsin, Live Out of State”).

Live in Wisconsin, Work Out of State

If you have already determined that you fit the criteria and are a Wisconsin resident and you worked out of state, you will be taxed by Wisconsin on any income earned out of state. File your resident return with Wisconsin using Form 1 and file your return with whichever state you worked in. Then fill out Schedule OS and file it along with your Wisconsin income tax return. Make sure to attach the other state’s return and your W-2 (which your employer should have sent you) in order to avoid dual taxation on income earned out of state. Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan and Minnesota have agreements in place already so that Wisconsin residents will only be taxed by Wisconsin on income earned from wages, salaries and commissions.

Work in Wisconsin, Live Out of State

If you are a part-year resident or a nonresident and you earned more than $2,000 from wages, salaries or commissions from Wisconsin sources, you are required to file a part-year resident return. Nonresidents and part-year residents file Form-1NPR. For more information on how to fill out Form-1NPR, you can download the instructions above.

Nonresidents of Wisconsin who earned any income from rents or royalties from property they own in Wisconsin, the sale of property in Wisconsin, profit or losses from businesses or farming in Wisconsin or winnings from gambling or the lottery are required to file a nonresident return with Wisconsin.

Individuals filing as single can exclude up to $250,000 and married couples filing jointly can exclude up to $500,000 in capital gains if it is from the sale of their main home. You can make this exclusion on both your state and federal income tax returns.

Nonresidents and part-year residents file Form-1NPR. For more information on how to fill out Form-1NPR, you can download the instructions above.