Vermont Tax Filing

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Filing Your Taxes in Vermont

Filing taxes is always a little frustrating no matter which way you look at it and sometimes you need a little help. Which form do I file with my return for which state? How do I find out my residency status? How does my residency status affect my tax return? You can find the answers to these questions and more here to help make filing your taxes as easy as 1-2-3!

Income tax returns must be filed by April 18th.

Online Tax Software: Compare Them Here

If want to prepare and file your taxes the easy way, consider using online tax software. TaxAct and e-File.com are the major tax software providers and you can check here to see what each offers and what their prices are. TaxAct also offers FREE state filing for Vermont. Check to see if you qualify!

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Vermont Tax Forms

Determine Your Residency Status

If you lived in Vermont or earned income in Vermont while living there or out of state, you may be required to file a Vermont tax return. Have a look below to find out if your residency status and income sources require you to file with Vermont.

Vermont Residents

If your permanent residence was in Vermont, or you lived in Vermont for more than 183 days, then you are a Vermont resident. If you were required to file a federal tax return in 2016, made more than $100 in income generated in Vermont, or earned more than $1,000 in taxable income, you are required to file a Vermont resident state tax return. For information on taxable income in Vermont and what is considered income generated in Vermont, see page 7 of the 2016 Vermont Income Tax Return Booklet. Residents file Form IN-111 in for their return. If you need help on filling out Form IN-111, you can download the 2016 Vermont Income Tax Return Booklet above.

Part-Year Residents

Anyone who lived in Vermont for only a portion of the year or fewer than 183 days is a part-year Vermont resident. If you were required to file a federal tax return in 2016, made more than $100 in income generated in Vermont, or earned more than $1,000 in taxable income, you are required to file a Vermont state tax return. For information on taxable income in Vermont and what is considered income generated in Vermont, see page 7 of the 2016 Vermont Income Tax Return Booklet. Residents file Form IN-111 in for their return. If you need help on filling out Form IN-111, you can download the 2016 Vermont Income Tax Return Booklet above.

Live in Vermont, Work Out of State

Vermont residents who work in other states will be taxed on that income by Vermont. Be aware that the other state may also tax you on that income, so to avoid dual taxation, you can apply for a credit from Vermont for any taxes you paid on income earned out of state. File as a resident using Vermont Form IN-111 and attach Form IN-112 and fill out Calculation B. If you need additional information, you can download the 2016 Vermont Income Tax Return Booklet above.

Nonresidents Who Worked or Sold Property in Vermont

If your residence was not in Vermont at all this year and you lived in Vermont fewer than 183 then you are not a Vermont resident. See the above income requirements for part-year residents to determine if you need to file with Vermont. Nonresidents file Form IN-111 in for their return. If you need help filling out Form IN-111, you can download the 2016 Vermont Income Tax Return Booklet above.