South Carolina Tax Filing

Need more time? Get an extension until October 15 in just 5 minutes. Start Now with E-File.com.
South Carolina Flag

Filing Your Taxes in South Carolina

Filing taxes can be a frustrating process, but you have found a great resource for making it all a little easier. Here, you can find information on your residency status, how it affects your taxes and what forms to fill out.

Income tax returns must be filed by April 18th.

Online Tax Software: Compare Them Here

If you want to make doing your taxes online easy, you might want to consider using online tax software. e-File.com and TaxAct are the most well-known software providers out there for doing your taxes online, but they each have their pros and cons.

e-File.com offers FREE state income tax filing for South Carolina, so make sure to check if you’re eligible.

35
Start E-File
14
Start E-File
  • Fast Refund
  • Pricing
  • Ease of Use
  • Accuracy
  • Phone Support
  • Local Support
  • FREE Audit Support
*Rotate your phone to landscape to see the full comparison.

South Carolina Tax Forms

What Kind of Resident Am I?

Anyone who lived or worked in South Carolina is required to file a return. Find out which forms you need to fill out by determining your residency status.

South Carolina Residents

If your permanent residence was in South Carolina for the whole tax year, you are a South Carolina resident. Anyone under the age of 65 who filed a federal tax return or anyone who had South Carolina income tax withheld from their wages must also file a South Carolina resident tax return. Anyone over 65 who earned more than $15,000 (single) or $30,000 (married, filing jointly) is required to file a South Carolina state tax return.

South Carolina taxes its residents on all income earned even if that income was earned outside of South Carolina. Use Form-1040 to file your South Carolina tax return. If you need more information on how to file Form-1040, you can download the SC1040 Instructions 2016 above. If you have any other questions or need more information regarding filing a South Carolina resident tax return, you can download the South Carolina Department of Revenue Forms and Instructions above.

Part-Year Residents

If your permanent residence was in South Carolina for part of the year, then you are considered a part-year South Carolina resident. This includes people who moved to and from South Carolina within the tax year. There are two options for filing as a part-year resident. You can file either as a South Carolina resident and use Form-1040 and file for a credit for any income you made out of state by filling out Form-1040TC. Your other option is to file as a nonresident by filing Form-1040 and attaching Schedule NR. If you would like more information on how to fill out Form-1040, Form-1040TC or Schedule NR, you can download the South Carolina Department of Revenue Forms and Instructions above.

Live in South Carolina, Work Out of State

South Carolina residents who work out of state may be taxed on that income by that state. South Carolina offers a credit to avoid dual taxation on out of state income. To apply for this credit, file Form-1040 and Form-1040TC and attach your return from the other state. You can also use this form for income earned in Canadian Provinces or similar state-like entities. This credit does not apply to other countries, including Italy and for the purposes of this credit, Puerto Rico is not considered a state.

Work in South Carolina, Live Out of State

If you did not live in South Carolina at all during the tax year, then you are a nonresident. Nonresidents who earn income in South Carolina and that income is greater than their federal personal exemption, are required to pay South Carolina state income taxes on that income. File Form-1040 and attach Schedule NR to file your nonresident return on income you earned in South Carolina. If you need further information on how to file Form-1040 or Schedule NR, you can download the South Carolina Department of Revenue Forms and Instructions and the SC1040 Instructions 2016 above.

If you are a nonresident who sold property in South Carolina, you follow the same rules as nonresidents who worked in South Carolina. See “Work in South Carolina, Live Out of State” for more information.