Rhode Island Tax Filing

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Filing Your Taxes in Rhode Island

Filing taxes can be frustrating. Here, you can find information that will help make filing your taxes in Rhode Island easier and faster. Find out what your residency status is, which forms you need to file and on what income.

Income tax returns must be filed by April 18th.

Online Tax Software: Compare Them Here

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Rhode Island Tax Forms

Determine Your Residency Status

If you lived or worked in Rhode Island, you are required to file a Rhode Island state income tax return. Have a look here to find out what your residency status is and what forms you need to file on income earned in Rhode Island.

Rhode Island Residents

Anyone who lived in Rhode Island for more than 183 days or whose permanent residence was in Rhode Island for the whole year is a Rhode Island resident. If you are a Rhode Island resident and filed a federal tax return or you are an individual and your income exceeded the federal exceptions, you are required to file a Rhode Island resident tax return using Form RI-1040. For more information on how to properly fill out Form RI-1040, you can download the 2016 Instructions for Filing RI-1040 above.

Part-Year Residents

If you took up residency or stopped living in Rhode Island in the last tax year, you are considered a part-year resident. If you filed a federal tax return and are a part-year Rhode Island resident, you are required to file a part-year resident Rhode Island tax return, by filling out Schedule V on page 9 of Form RI-1040. If you earned income outside of Rhode Island while you were a Rhode Island resident, you will need to file Form RI-1040NRMU. For more information on how to properly fill out Form RI-1040NRMU, you can download the 2016 Instructions for Filing RI-1040 above.

Live in Rhode Island, Work Out of State

Rhode Island will tax you on any income earned out of state while you were a Rhode Island resident. The state you worked in might also tax you on that income (dual taxation), but Rhode Island offers a credit on those taxes. To receive this credit, you have to apply for the credit for taxes paid to another state by filing Form RI-1040MU along with your Rhode Island state tax return Form RI-1040. For help and information on how to file a return on income earned out of state, you can download the 2016 Instructions for Filing RI-1040 above.

Work in Rhode Island, Live Out of State

You are not a Rhode Island resident if you lived outside of Rhode Island for more than 183 days or if your permanent residence was outside of Rhode Island for the whole year. If you claimed income earned in Rhode Island on your federal tax return, you are required to fill out Schedule III on page 7 of Form-1040. As a nonresident, you may also need to file a nonresident return with Rhode Island if any Rhode Island modifications were made that increased your federal adjusted gross income, even if didn’t have to file a federal return.

Nonresident Property Sales in Rhode Island

If you sold property in Rhode Island and are not a resident, you declare that income the same way as nonresidents declare income earned in Rhode Island. See “Work in Rhode Island, Live Out of State”.