Kentucky Tax Filing

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How to File Your Kentucky Taxes

Do you live in Kentucky? Then make sure you check our great information on how to file taxes in Kentucky.

The biggest pension exclusion is $41,110 for people who get railroad retirement benefits or who worked in local, state, or federal government and retired.

The low-income credit was replaced by the family-size credit. The income requirements range between $10,830 and $22,050 depending on the number of family members (from 1 to 4 or more).

State income taxes are due on April 18th.

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Believe it or not, there is a way to make doing your taxes a little less of a chore. You can prepare and file them online right from the comfort of your home using special tax preparation software - it’s easy, quick and often free.

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TaxAct also offers FREE state income tax filing for Kentucky, so make sure to check if you’re eligible.

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Kentucky Tax Forms

Determine Your Residency Status

The amount of your taxes depends on your residency status, so check below to see which category you fall in.

You Are a Resident of Kentucky

If you had your permanent home in Kentucky during the whole past tax year, you are a Kentucky resident. In this case, if you exceed the limit set by the state (see the Form 740 instructions in the 2016 Kentucky Individual Income Tax Forms Booklet which you can download above), you need to file a tax return with Kentucky. If you are a Kentucky resident, the state will tax any income you make, regardless of the source (in or out of Kentucky).

To file your resident tax return, use Form 740 or Form 740EZ. You will need to include your federal tax return along with your Kentucky return. For other information, see the Form 740 instructions in the 2016 Kentucky Individual Income Tax Forms Booklet which you can download above.

You Are a Part-Year Resident of Kentucky

If you had your permanent home in Kentucky for only a part of the previous tax year, you are a part-year resident of Kentucky.

In this case, see the “You Are a Resident of Kentucky” or “You Are a Resident of Kentucky Who Works in a Different State” sections in order to find out how to submit your tax return for the time when you were a resident of Kentucky (during this period, Kentucky taxes all your income, no matter where they come from).

For the period when you were a nonresident (during this period Kentucky taxes all your income made from Kentucky sources), see the “You Are a Nonresident Working in Kentucky” or “You Are a Nonresident Who Sold Property in Kentucky” sections.

You Are a Kentucky Resident Who Works in a Different State

If you reside in Kentucky and earned income in a different state, and that state taxed you, you may be eligible for a tax credit from Kentucky in order to avoid dual taxation. Find out more information in the Form 740 instructions in the 2016 Kentucky Individual Income Tax Forms Booklet which you can download above.

You Are a Nonresident Who Worked or Sold Property in Kentucky

If you did not have your home in Kentucky for the whole past tax year, you have a nonresident status in Kentucky. In this case, and if your gross income exceeded the amount permitted for your family size, you will have to file a nonresident return on money that came from a source in Kentucky (property sales included). To do that, use Form 740NP (which can be found in the 740NP instructions in the 2016 Kentucky Income Tax Return Nonresident or Part-Year Resident Booklet above).