Washington Tax Filing

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Filing Your Washington State Taxes

It is tax season again! Figuring out and filing your tax forms can be intimidating – but there is help. Here you will find answers, forms and more that will make your paperwork easier, faster and less stressful. The information below will help you determine your residency status, find the correct forms you need and give you other information you want to get started.

State income tax returns for 2013 are due April 15.

Comparing Your Options in Online Tax Software

TurboTax and TaxAct are the most prominent online tax software providers for those who do their own taxes. All are appropriate for many types of personal and business tax preparation. They differ in pricing and each has its own positives and negatives. So check them out, compare and read the reviews to pick the one that’s best for you.

TurboTax offers FREE Washington State tax filing services. Click on the provider to find out if you qualify.

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Washington Tax Forms

  • No Tax Forms for this State yet. Please check back later, we are permanently updating.
Washington Taxes

Washington does not tax its residents on their income, but it does tax businesses and corporations as well as franchises. And just because you don’t pay state income taxes in Washington, don’t think you aren’t paying taxes. Washington has one of the highest sales tax rates in the nation at 6.8%. Especially on tobacco products, alcohol and gasoline. In addition, counties and cities are also allowed to charge their won sales taxes, so you end up paying between 8.5% and 10% when all is said and done. Property in Washington may also be subject to taxes.

Property Taxes in Washington

Unless your personal property and real property is not exempted by the state tax laws, you are required to pay property taxes. Most individual personal property is tax-exempt but check the Washington State Department of Revenue website to make sure.

Use Tax

Washington, like most states, charges a sales tax at the point of purchase. If you purchase goods out of state, you may be required to pay a use tax to Washington. If the goods were purchased in a state that doesn’t have sales tax or the sales tax is lower than Washington’s, you are required to pay a use tax on those goods. Purchases made online or from a mail order catalog usually include Washington’s sales tax, but be sure to check the invoices. If you purchase real property and acquire personal property, that personal property is subject to the use tax.

To pay your use tax, go to your local taxing authority website and find out the rate for your location. You can then either file online or fill out and send the Consumer Use Tax Return Form available on the Washington State Department of Revenue website.

Business & Occupation Tax

Washington charges businesses and corporations a special tax commonly called the B&O tax. It is a gross receipts tax, measured on the value of products, gross proceeds of sale or the gross income made by the business.

Since Washington doesn’t charge income tax, the B&O tax is based on the gross income which means no deductions for materials, labor, taxes or other business costs may be applied. There are a few credits that you can claim under special circumstances.

To file your B&O tax, use the excise tax return or you can e-file.

To find out what your B&O tax liability is, check the Washington State Department of Revenue website

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